Baby Bumblebee

Posted: Monday, October 8, 2007, 9:18 am

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(Length: 47 sec)

Learn why it's a good idea for baby bumblebees to behave themselves, all while reinforcing your child's early literacy skills.

This is a fun song sometimes used in storytimes. As you sing this song with your child, act it out together using the motions described below.

I'm bringing home a baby bumble bee.
Cup hand together in front, rock back and forth.
Won't my Mommy be so proud of me?
Point finger at self.
I'm bringing home a baby bumble bee.
Cup hand together in front, rock back and forth.
Buzzzz, buzzzz, buzzzz
Press together fingers on one hand and move them around like a flying bee.
OUCH!! It stung me!!
Lightly touch child's arm or leg to simulate a bee sting.

I'm squishing up my baby bumblebee.
Won't my Mommy be so proud of me?
I'm squishing up my baby bumblebee.
Eeewww! It's all over me!

I'm wiping off my baby bumblebee.
Won't my Mommy be so proud of me?
I'm wiping off my baby bumblebee.
Now my Momma will be happy!

Help your child be ready to read by practicing early literacy skills. The ability to describe things and events, and to tell stories helps children to understand what they are reading, when they start to read.

You can help by:

  • Talking to you child about what you are doing, even as you go about daily tasks
  • Encouraging children to speak and listening to them carefully
  • Using books to help them tell stories

Activities for Babies and Toddlers:

  • Point to pictures and talk about them as you look at books with your child.
  • As you share books together, your child maybe only interested for a couple of minutes at a time. Stop when he/she looses interest and share books again later.

Activities for Preschoolers:

  • As you read books together, you be the listener and let your child tell you the story. It's alright if parts are left out, or if some parts of the story are made up. Research shows that your child's ability to tell stories will help him/her understand what he reads.
  • Enjoy your time together. If it's not a pleasant experience, try again later.

More like this: early literacy songs Audio and video for Babies Audio and video for Preschoolers Audio and video for Toddlers